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Is Your Favorite Beverage Causing Your Gout Attack? | Cure Gout Now

Is Your Favorite Beverage Causing Your Gout Attack?


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If you want to do everything you can to prevent a gout attack, then you may want to look into your favorite beverages to make sure that they’re not increasing your chances of a gout recurrence.  A recent study published on BMJ.com in January, 2008, called “Soft Drinks, Fructose Consumption, and the Risk of Gout in Men: Prospective Cohort Study”, by Hyon Choi and Gary Curhan showed that men who regularly consume foods and beverages containing fructose have a notably higher risk of a gout attack.

Gout levels in the United States have doubled throughout the last few decades.  This increase in gout attacks mirrors the increase in fructose consumption through soft drinks and other sugary foods.  Fructose is a simple form of sugar that is now known to increase the production of uric acid in the body.

Though patients who suffer gout attacks are typically instructed by their doctors to cut alcohol, organ meats, and legumes from their diets, as they are high in purines – organic compounds that encourage uric acid production in the body – it is rare for patients to be told to limit their consumption of fructose-filled foods such as soft drinks.

American and Canadian researchers examined the relationship between the intake of high-fructose foods such as soft drinks and the risk of a gout attack. They looked into more than 46,000 men who had no history of gout attacks, and who were aged 40 or older.  They followed these men for 12 years, compiling data on food consumption regarding more than 130 different beverages and foods including both regular and diet soft drinks, as well as fruits and fruit juices which are also naturally quite high in their fructose levels. From the start of the study, the researchers collected weight, medication use, and medical condition data.  During that time, there were 755 new cases of gout attacks diagnosed within the participants.

The major findings of the study included the following:

The more sugar-sweetened soft drinks were consumed by the participants, the higher their risks of a gout attack would be.
When men who drank fewer than one serving of soft drinks in a month were compared to participants who drank over five or six servings every week, the risk of a gout attack was increased by 29 percent.
The participants who drank two or more servings of soft drinks daily increased their risk of a gout attack by a significant 85 percent when compared to those who consumed fewer than one serving of soft drinks every month.
Participants who consumed only soft drinks did not increase their risk of a gout attack.
Fructose-rich foods such as fruits and their juices also increased the risk of a gout attack.  However, the study’s authors caution that the interpretation of the impact of fruits and fruit juices on the risk of gout should be interpreted with care as eating some fruits and vegetables is important for the prevention of high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, and some cancers, and should therefore perhaps be considered more beneficial than hazardous.

The study’s results occurred independently of other gout attack risk factors, such as age, body mass index, blood pressure, diuretic use, alcohol consumption, and the rest of the diet of the participants.

 


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13 Responses

  1. Linda
    August 14th, 2008 | 6:18 pm

    Interesting, how much gout has increased, through the years. Could it be in the genes? This information, is helpful, as I am aware that diet has made my uric acid levels go down. THANK YOU

  2. arlene
    August 14th, 2008 | 6:28 pm

    i had a masectomy in 2001. after that my legs got stiff and my knees were really sore and would ache. i put ice on my knees and tried all kinds of supplements,vit.c&e, calcium, bcomplex, accuncture,herbs, and others but i do not want my knees operated on. i now have diabetes but just watch my sugar with food, but i wont give up till i find a cure.thank you.

  3. JOE
    August 14th, 2008 | 11:46 pm

    GOOD TIP LISA, I DON’T DRINK SODA MUCH AT ALL BUT NOW I WILL PROBABLY GIVE IT UP AL TOGETHER.

  4. August 15th, 2008 | 1:38 am

    Lisa,
    This is a very interesting finding, since it goes straight against the classical natural gout remedie; Cherries, which have one of the highest fructose content. How come?

  5. August 15th, 2008 | 2:32 am

    hito you,
    does diet soda cause gout?
    what kind of food can you eat
    and how much can you have?i don’t
    know what to do. please help me if
    you can.
    thank you so much,
    bj

  6. Girish
    August 15th, 2008 | 5:14 am

    If fructose is causing problems it is imperative that one should avoid fruits.
    this is becoming preposterous.
    If we follow medical advise given with best of intentions one will have to live like a saint for restof his life.

    This will be for what purpose remains to be debated.

  7. Lilian
    August 15th, 2008 | 9:03 am

    Hi Lisa,
    Sometimes tropical fruits differ from western fruits….. 2. HOw do we differentiate between health mixed drink which has fruit and vegetables inside with frutose?

  8. August 15th, 2008 | 9:55 am

    ive been told to eat and drink more pineapple to help prevent an attack ? is this good advise?

    i am taking 100mg of allopurinal a day now and did have the worse attack ive every had at the begining but things are better now.

  9. August 15th, 2008 | 11:28 am

    One thing to remember from any study is that they are generally conducted based on statistical analysis… and you are not a statistic.

    Gout is a complex metabolic imbalance, where too much or too little of some a foods or beverages in the diet can “tip the scales” and encourage Uric Acid build up or conversely reduce the levels of uric acid.

    It’s of course important that this study is taken in context. Generally fresh fruit is good for our wellbeing overall in the right amounts, and as part of a gout friendly diet. However, an excess of any food or beverage, making the diet unbalanced can have a detrimental effect.

    My suggestion would be to replace beverages with water where possible as this has effect of hydrating the body and “flushing out” uric acid.

    Also, if you are having fruit, try to eat the whole fruit as there are many other beneficial compounds in them and the fruit sugars are usually less concentrated than in fruit drinks.

    If you are currently taking cherries or cherry juice and it is helping, just be aware of and perhaps reduce other fructose consumption in the diet.

  10. prakash
    August 18th, 2008 | 6:50 am

    i was advised by a doctor that drinking tender coconut juice and yogurt helps kidney to flush impurities better .any comments.pl advise if eggs can be taken regurlarly since egg white is high in protien

  11. August 22nd, 2008 | 11:05 am

    prakash -

    Chicken eggs are low in purine, in fact egg whites are purine free.

    However, egg yolk is high in cholesterol so I’d suggest limiting them to no more than per week.

  12. Vaughn Peltier
    September 4th, 2008 | 3:34 pm

    Okay,
    The lady brought up a good point about black cherries being high in fructose but is recommended for grout control and cure? What gives? Need a reply, because I eat these cherries daily. A question that needs some answers?!

  13. September 5th, 2008 | 1:41 pm

    Hi Vaughn - thanks for your comments. I think my answer above covered this point, but it may have got a little lost in all the replies so here it is again:

    “My suggestion would be to replace beverages with water where possible as this has effect of hydrating the body and “flushing out” uric acid.

    Also, if you are having fruit, try to eat the whole fruit as there are many other beneficial compounds in them and the fruit sugars are usually less concentrated than in fruit drinks.

    If you are currently taking cherries or cherry juice and it is helping, just be aware of and perhaps reduce other fructose consumption in the diet.”

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